eucalyptus_lavender_sachets-3eucalyptus_lavender_sachets eucalyptus_lavender_sachets-5 eucalyptus_lavender_sachets2

I love fresh eucalyptus, and it’s quite possible to find a bundle in a vase or drying on a wall somewhere around our home often. My children tease me that I’m trying to allure koalas, but truthfully, they’re an inexpensive way to add muted green tones and gentle fragrance to our spaces. They tend to last longer than fresh blooms and are just as lovely and fragrant when dried, which makes them as much an economical choice as an aesthetic one. That combo wins big points in our home.

The scents of a home have always felt equally as intrinsic to me as the visuals. There’s something comforting about a good, natural home scent, whether the food on the stove, the glowing winter candle, or the diffuser on the shelf. With no surprise, Mark and I have a soft spot for old homes and have always chosen the quirky charm of an old fixer-upper over the swanky new ones, but they can easily smell musty or forgotten if left alone too long, especially our closets.

Closets and drawers feel especially important in the winter home when they’re stocked with cozy knits. I imagine no one truly likes pulling a sweater over their head that smells like dust and neglect, even though many do. This season I decided to make some natural, gentle scents for our family’s closets and drawers using the dried eucalyptus leaves, dried lavender (another favorite bloom that I wish we had enough sun in our yard to grow), and essential oils.

They were quick and easy to make and easy enough for children to help, although I recommend gloves in case they are at all sensitive. I purchased the little cotton pouches at our local craft store. You can find something similar here or here, or simply sew them yourself. (I’m not quite skilled enough for that yet.) I opted for the drawstrings so I could empty and refill as needed. While more expensive or difficult to make on the front end, they seemed like a wiser choice for the long run. If you don’t have lavender growing in your yard, I usually purchase mine in bulk at our local grocer. Below I jotted down the loose measurements and process I used. I’ve placed them in bureau drawers or simply hung a few on hangers in the closets. (Parents: please read the note below.)

5 dried eucalyptus stems

2 cups of dried lavender

lavender and eucalyptus essential oils

small cotton drawstring pouch

bowl and spoon for mixing

hand blender or food processor to chop the eucalyptus leaves more finely

Lightly hand wash and air out purchased pouches ahead of time. Strip the eucalyptus branches and crush the leaves to release a bit of scent. Mix together with the lavender. Add 5 drops of each essential oil and mix again with a spoon. Fill the pouches to your liking. I folded the top of the pouches over to make them a bit smaller. It should make 6-8 pouches.

A SPECIAL NOTE: If you’re adding these sachets to a child’s closet or bureau, make sure they are out of reach or that children who are old enough know not to open, touch, or eat the contents. With babies, simply hang in their closet or wardrobe to more gentle diffuse the scents. Their skin may be too sensitive for the sachets to rub directly on their clothing. 

 

20 replies
  1. Laura
    Laura says:

    What a wonderful idea! I love the smell of eucalyptus and lavender. I am looking forward to making these as gifts and for my home! :)

    Reply
  2. audrey
    audrey says:

    Hi there, I came to your blog through IG….and just want to say I’m in love! I would love to make the sachets, but was wondering which Eucalyptus oil you used? I use YL and they have 3 – thanks for your hard work on such a wonderful blog and IG!

    Reply
  3. Hilary Davis
    Hilary Davis says:

    Hi Bethany,

    I have fresh eucalyptus available to me–do I simply leave it out to let it dry? How long?

    Love your blog!

    Reply
    • Bethany
      Bethany says:

      Thank you, Hillary! I’m sure there are several ways to do this, but I’ll share mine. When it begins to dry naturally in the vase, I’ll remove it from the water, snip off any gross looking ends, wrap the ends of the bundle in natural cooking twine and hang on a peg/nail. We have one in our pantry that I typically use, although it’s pretty enough to hang anywhere! Many people use it as a decor itself, keeping dried in a wall or in a basket or vase. Good luck and happy drying!

      Reply
  4. Kristen
    Kristen says:

    Wondering where to get Eucalyptus?? Live in Michigan. I don’t think I have ever seen it for sale fresh. Thanks!

    Reply
    • Bethany
      Bethany says:

      Great question! I live in a small town in Texas, and since it’s not native here, large bundles only occasionally show up in our grocers. More typically it’s pieced together with other greens. Florists can order it in bundles for me, but I’d only do that for a special occasion because of expense. In cities, if you live in one, it will be easier. Try a flower market (wholesale is typically prices lower than a florist) or a Whole Foods (or something similar). I’ve asked my grocery florists, too. It’s always a good start to ask them and find out if they ever carry it. Good luck!

      Reply
  5. Julie
    Julie says:

    I’m so happy to discover your blog. Your writing is lyrical and thoughtful and your images stunning! What a beautiful and inspiring space you have created! I’m looking forward to following along.

    Reply
    • Bethany
      Bethany says:

      They are the most basic of home scents for me. When I begin to feel lost with essential oils, I always begin again with these two scents in one way or another. ;)

      Reply
  6. Alice
    Alice says:

    Gorgeous new look for the website and another great idea, both simple, practical and comforting. Thank you. You’re one talented lady!

    Reply
  7. Nadine
    Nadine says:

    I love this idea Such a cute and easy way to add some seasonal scent to the home. I am already pondering what to fill those little bags with for the coming seasons, although I haven’t actually got them, yet. Thanks for sharing. x

    Reply

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

  1. […] me what else has been added to the candles and reed diffusers to create the scents. Bethany at Cloistered Away has a simple natural alternative that I am going to be making in the coming weeks. I read this […]

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *